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Writ

Definition of 'Writ'

A writ is issued as the first step in any legal process pursued through the High Court. It is a command for the person receiving it to attend the court on a set day – the hearing date.

Writs are issued usually in an action by someone owed a great deal of money and who has failed to encourage to borrower to pay, or to come to an arrangement to pay. The issue of a writ can prompt a slow payer to pay, as it focuses the mind, and the legal proceedings will then cease.

If not, and the matter proceeds to the High Court, and if the person receiving the writ fails to defend it, then judgment will follow, which means that the debt is legally enforceable and cannot subsequently be disputed.

A writ entry on a credit report is a significantly adverse addition. It is evidence that a lender has had to resort to court action to recover monies, so other lenders will be much less inclined to lend.

If there is a writ on your credit report which has been discontinued or dismissed, then to update your credit report you will need to advise each credit reference agency in turn, providing all supporting documentation from the court.

Writ information is retained on your credit report for 3 years. If you have lodged an ‘Intention to Defend’ with the court regarding the writ, you then need to advise each of the credit reference agencies by sending them an update form together with a stamped copy of the court document. The writ will then be removed from your credit report.

In a lower court, a writ is called a summons.

Use the links below to locate the term you are looking for. If you can't locate it, please get in touch.

Credit Jargon Starting 'G'

Credit Jargon Starting 'I'

Credit Jargon Starting 'J'

Credit Jargon Starting 'L'

Credit Jargon Starting 'M'

Credit Jargon Starting 'S'

Credit Jargon Starting 'T'

Credit Jargon Starting 'V'

Credit Jargon Starting 'W'

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